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Hepatitis B in children


Hepatitis is an inflammation of the liver. The hepatitis B (also called serum hepatitis) is caused by the hepatitis B virus (HBV).

HBV can cause a wide range of symptoms, from general malaise to chronic liver disease, which can eventually lead to liver cancer. Hepatitis B is a viral infection of the liver that can lead to both acute and chronic disease.

The hepatitis B virus can be transmitted to babies by a member of the family. Most commonly, it occurs as a subclinical infection, when a family member or other adult carrying the virus has frequent contact with the child.

The infection may occur in a non-obvious way (for example, if the adult has a small cut on the hand and the child has chapped skin from eczema).

The spread of hepatitis B occurs through infected body fluids, such as blood, saliva, semen, vaginal secretions, tears, and urine. And also through contaminated blood transfusions, by sharing infected needles or syringes, by having sex with a person infected with HBV or by transmitting a newborn from his infected mother.

According to the WHO, World Health Organization, children infected before the age of six are the most at risk of developing chronic infections.

The symptoms are as follows:

- General discomfort.

- Yellowish skin.

- Extreme fatigue.

- Dark colored urine.

- Abdominal pain. Vomiting and diarrhea

The hepatitis B vaccine is included in the national vaccination card of many countries, it is the Pentavalent vaccine, which is applied at 2,4, and 6 months, La American Academy of Pediatrics recommends giving the Hepatitis B vaccine to the newborn child, at one month and at 6 months of life.

The prognosis for hepatitis B is good, and complications such as chronic, fulminant hepatitis, or cirrhosis are found in approximately 10 percent of patients.

You can read more articles similar to Hepatitis B in children, in the category of Childhood Diseases on site.


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